CacheCrazy.Com: A Look Back At 2012

Friday, December 28, 2012

A Look Back At 2012

I'm not quite sure where this year went.  It feels just like yesterday I was sitting here, blogging about all the great caches I found in 2011.  I was able to get out caching practically every day, and in the process, was regularly awarding "favorite points" for awesome caches and cache experiences.  As I approached 2012, I had the 1000th cache milestone in my sights.  My GSAK stats were telling me it as a possibility in 2012.  The mild winter we had in the northeast made for prime geocaching conditions.  Compared to other winters, I found a decent amount of caches, and I was able to continue that good luck into the spring.  Unfortunately, a series of events occurring, pretty much all at the same time, during the summer have forced me into a self-imposed semi-hiatus on geocaching.  Trust me, I'm still scouring geocaching.com looking at all the awesome caches still being published.  I still work feverishly on cache puzzles (right, Harold?).  I just haven't had much time to get out there and actually search for caches, save for the quick one, here and there.

As a result of my dormancy, I've had a tough time coming up with a year-end retrospective, as it was.  It's funny how finding a cache can jog your memory on other similar caches you've found in the past.  The problem is, when you cache infrequently, some of those caches seem to slip in between the cracks. Even caches I found six months ago feel like it was ages ago.

That being said, a few caches stand out, to me, as memorable, for one reason or another.  It would have been a tall task to drum up a top ten list.  Therefore, I'd like to reflect on three caches which, to me, stood above the rest this year.

In no particular order...


GCV8GK-Pour Me A Cold One by trail hound

This is a Traditional Cache hidden in Sussex County, New Jersey.  This was a tricky hide, as it was well camouflaged in the woods.  Finding ground zero, however, was only half the battle.  In order to sign the logbook you first needed to figure out how to retrieve the cache container.  I will not give away the methods used, but I will say you need to needed to use the nearby (liquid) resources to bring the cache container within reach.  And, oh yeah, you needed to be quick about it.  There was a method to it, and I figured it out in time.  Not the first time.  Or the second, for that matter.  This cache was an inspiration for a new cache I conjured up in my head. (Right, Harold?)  Unfortunately, that's where the idea has stayed.


The cache IS there-somewhere!



GC3AFBY- Ript2Shrds- Satan's Crack by -Ript2Shrds-

If you weren't part of the 2012 CacheCrazy.com Trilogy of Terror, you missed out on a great time.  As part of the group caching experience, we went on a short, but STEEP hike up this boulder formation just outside of Hazleton, PA.  We managed some tricky maneuvering up, across, and down the boulders in order to make the find.  (As I'm writing this on a snowy and icy morning, I'd hate to see what that hike would be like on a day like this.)  Plunging into Satan's Crack with some of my finest and newest friends make for a fun summer's day.  The scenery was breathtaking, and the water was refreshing.  This is what it's all about!  I can't wait to see where we decide to go in 2013!

Our Fearless Leader!

Picturesque view.




GC3E1MG- A Little Bit of Everything by Redknight

Who says you have to complete a multicache in one trip?  Or two?  Or twelve?  This ten (yes, TEN) stage multi in Newton, New Jersey was arguably the most challenging cache adventure I've been on, from a mental standpoint.  It starts with a field puzzle which will leave you doubting your own third grade math skills, and ends with, for lack of a better expression, a balancing act in which you better be darn sure you have your footing, or you'll be taking quite the mud bath.  In between is a hodgepodge of field puzzles and waypoints which will leave you scratching your head, and cursing, under your breath, yourself,  the cache owner, and life in general.  I made the experience more interesting by finding the stages out of order.  The entire cache is located within the confines of a park, but there is a lot of ground to cover, and lots of potential hiding spaces.  Sneaky, clever hiding spaces.  The Coupe de grace was an out-of-this-world final stage.  The hide was great, trying to get to it was pure hell (it was a dry summer day), and the container was loaded with swag.  Without a doubt, it was the most rewarding finale stage I've found, to date.  Redknight is one of my favorite cache owners, and this cache is a good example of why.







2 comments:

TravelnbHappy21 said...

Trilogy of Terror was an amazing adventure with great caching friends, we had a blast. Thanks smithie23 for the blog and bringing back the memories of that day and we can't wait to see what adventure lies ahead in 2013 !!

~HAPPY NEW YEAR & HAPPY CACHING everyone!~

Big_Dog1970 said...

Yes Dave I am still waiting to get together with you and build that cache. I do have the materials in my basement to make a little bit smaller scale model of what you described to me.
Unfortunately though, due to having phlebitis in my left leg, my doctor has grounded me from any physical activity for a while. So no caching for me until probably spring time. Well I might get me some easy park and grabs but that's it.

Cache Ya Later
Harold

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